Serbia is second in Europe in terms of electronic device prices

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Prices of goods and services in Serbia are at the level of 57.6 percent of the European Union average, according to the results of a survey by the European statistics agency Eurostat.

In Serbia, consumer electronics (televisions, audio-visual devices, computers and computer equipment) are the most expensive among the countries in the region, with prices in all countries except Northern Macedonia above the EU average.

Electronics in Serbia are 16 percent more expensive than the European average, while in Iceland they are 22 percent more expensive. In all other countries, electronic devices can be purchased at lower prices than in our country.

As for electricity, gas and other fuels, prices in the region are roughly the same and half the EU average.

Consumer prices in Serbia are at the same level as in Albania and slightly higher than in the rest of the region. In Northern Macedonia they are half the EU average, in Bosnia and Herzegovina they are 45 percent less, and in Montenegro 43 percent.

The prices of food and non-alcoholic beverages in Serbia are at 80 percent of the EU average, alcohol and tobacco at 62 percent, and the prices of clothes and shoes are close to the EU average (around 93 percent). In the region, food, non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages and tobacco are the most expensive in Albania, and alcohol and tobacco in northern Macedonia are the cheapest in all of Europe.

Restaurants and hotels in the region are about 50 percent cheaper than the EU average, with the cheapest in Northern Macedonia and Albania, and the most expensive in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

In Serbia, the prices of communication services are at 73 percent of the EU average, and in the region they are more expensive only than Northern Macedonia.

The Eurostat survey covered more than 2,000 goods and services and was conducted in 37 European countries, including EU members, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Serbia, Montenegro, Northern Macedonia, Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Turkey.

Where it is most expensive for consumers?

Denmark has the highest consumer prices in the European Union, 41 percent above the EU average, and the lowest in Romania, 45 percent below the average.

Denmark is the most expensive EU country when it comes to food and non-alcoholic beverages, clothing and footwear, while alcohol, tobacco, clothing and footwear are the cheapest in Bulgaria.

In addition to Denmark, consumer prices in Norway and Iceland are 39 percent and 37 percent above the EU average, in Sweden the prices of goods and services are 30 percent above the average, and in Finland 26 percent, which makes the Nordic countries the most expensive European countries.

Switzerland has the highest consumer prices in the whole of Europe, 70 percent above the EU average, and the lowest Turkey, 62 percent below the EU average.

Food and non-alcoholic beverages are most expensive in Switzerland, alcohol and tobacco in Norway, and clothing and footwear in Denmark.

Tobacco is the cheapest in Northern Macedonia

Northern Macedonia has the cheapest alcohol and tobacco, and food and non-alcoholic beverages, clothing and footwear are the cheapest in Turkey.

The biggest differences in prices in EU countries were recorded in restaurants and hotels, and when it comes to alcohol and tobacco.

Denmark (154 percent of the EU average), Sweden (138 percent) and Finland (131 percent) have the most expensive restaurants and hotels in the EU, and Bulgaria (46 percent of the EU average), Romania (53 percent) and Hungary (56 percent) have the cheapest.

The Irish pay the most for tobacco and alcohol, whose prices in that country are 87 percent above the EU average. Behind them are Finns (158 percent of the EU average), Swedes (136 percent) and French (133 percent). These products are the cheapest in Bulgaria (61 percent of the EU average), Hungary (69 percent) and Poland (70 percent).

Among EU countries, food and non-alcoholic beverages are cheapest in Romania (66 percent of the EU average) and Poland (68 percent), and most expensive in Denmark (129 percent of the EU average), Luxembourg (126 percent) and Austria (125 percent).

Differences in clothing prices are smaller among EU countries, from the cheapest Hungary (73 percent) to the most expensive Denmark (130 percent), 021 reports.