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Serbia ranked 29 out of 34 countries in innovation

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Serbia is ranked 29 out of 34 countries on the latest EU innovation and creativity index list, which is an alarming fact, it was said Monday at a roundtable at the Serbian Chamber of Commerce (PKS).

Serbia is ranked 29 out of 34 countries on the latest EU innovation and creativity index list, which is an alarming fact, it was said Monday at a roundtable at the Serbian Chamber of Commerce (PKS).

Head of the European Integration Section at the EU Delegation in Serbia Alberto Cammarata said that intellectual property is an important issue for the European Commission and for Brussels’ opinion on Serbia’s EU candidacy, but also commended the Serbian government’s effort to improve the situation in the sector.

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Cammarata pointed out that Serbia’s accession to the European Patent Organization in October 2010 is an important step forward and noted that Serbia has passed the necessary laws, for which it was commended in the report on Serbia’s progress in EU integration.

He said that Serbia is also preparing a patent bill and working to pass some more legislation, all of which is encouraging.

Assistant Minister of Science of Technological Development Radosav Cerovic warned that the number of patents created through scientific research is very low – only six or seven per year.

He said this was unacceptable and the potential is much greater, but left untapped, adding that the main goal is to apply more innovations in business.

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Secretary of the PKS Technological Innovation Committee Danica Micanovic said that Serbia is at the bottom of EU’s innovation list, but is above average when it comes to the activity of people between 20 and 24 years of age, and also improving in results of scientific research.

She said that intellectual property needs to be much better protected and stronger ties created between science and the economy.

Head of the Intellectual Property Office Branka Totic said that patents and their application are very useful for the economy, catching up to modern technology, breaking into the European market and attracting direct foreign investments.

The European Patent Organization, which has 38 full-fledged member states and two extension states which recognize European patents upon request, is designed to strengthen cooperation between European countries and creating a united European patent system.

The roundtable was organized by the PKS Technological Innovation Committee and the Intellectual Property Office of Serbia.

Source Emg.rs

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